thisbrighton.co.uk - Brighton: illustrated   (中文)

What's in a Name or a Phrase?

Gotta Read It...

The Great Storm of 1987 full story...

Doing the Undercliff Walk full story...

Take Three Piers full story...

An abc of Web Design go there...

The Digital Canvas go there...

Garden Wildlife full story...

Tom Russell Hits Town full story...

 

Canon: real or fake? Click for a larger image

Canons at Brighton Station?

Have a look at the gateposts at the front entrance of Brighton station. They seem to have been made out of upturned canon barrels! So were they, are they?

One view is that they really are canon barrels. Brighton used to have two batteries of canons on the seafront. They were removed in the 1850s. It is said that three of the canon barrels were used to form the gate posts. Others deny this on the grounds that the gateposts have been internally inspected and are judged not to be real canons.

But undoubtedly the gateposts have some resemblance to canon barrels, and are not in the same style as the cast iron pillars of the station's front canopy. So why was a canon-style chosen?

So what's the truth? I think I can settle this little historical controversy but you'll have to wait while I sort out permission from the copyright holder of a certain photograph.

The Daddy LonglegsDaddy Longlegs

The most peculiar, outlandish, eccentric Heath-Robinson train you could imagine: a train on stilts, that ran along the shore IN THE SEA!; or was it a pier that moved on wheels; or a ship on stilts. (Surely the original inspiration of Heath Robinson!)

The strangest part of this story is this: it did actually exist and it worked - at least, for a few years (1896 - 1901). It was called The Brighton and Rottingdean Seashore Electric Tramroad, but was known popularly as the Daddy Longlegs.

It was the brainchild of Brighton's most illustrious Victorian inventor, Magus Volk, whose more conventional train is still running today between Brighton Pier and Black Rock during the summer season.

I say 'conventional' meaning it doesn't have legs and it runs on land, and not in the sea. But nonetheless it Volks Electric Railway was still revolutionary in its day, and can claim to be the first electric-powered railway in Britain.

Full story, click here.

The LevelOn The Level

The Level is the park in the central area of the city. It is the northward part of what used to be called Valley Gardens, that is, the greens that run from Old Steine gardens at the seafront northwards to The Level. It is just north of St Peters Church which is at the fork of the London and Lewes Roads. "Valley" because this is the bottom of the valley through which the intermittent river, the Wellsbourne, once flowed, exiting to the sea though Pool Valley, near the city's bus station.

The Level is the place where the funfair pitches when it comes to Brighton several times in the year. It is the place where demonstrations often start or terminate. It is the site for an alternative festival, the Brighton Urban Free Festival (BUFF) when it is up and running. Today it is popular with students who live in nearby student halls. It also has a children's playground and a set of skateboarding ramps. For more info, click here.

 

Laganfauld About Us | Acknowledgements | Web Design Services | My Back Pages | ©2006 Laganfauld