thisbrighton.co.uk - Brighton: illustrated   (中文)

Tourism: The Visitor Economy

Gotta Read It...

The Great Storm of 1987 full story...

Doing the Undercliff Walk full story...

Take Three Piers full story...

An abc of Web Design go there...

The Digital Canvas go there...

Garden Wildlife full story...

Tom Russell Hits Town full story...

We Have A Strategy

Brighton Festival

In 2004 the city council produced a 10 year strategy for tourism, after consulting more than 500 interest groups and businesses. The strategy (all 72 pages of it) is a very long wish list of things that should be done, and if done, will deliver - it is calculated - another £200 million a year in tourist revenues and 12% more jobs.

The strategy is focussed around 5 key areas: quality, public safety, cultural investment, transport and marketing. It is all fairly obvious really. A high quality of service to visitors in a safe environment with lots of cultural attractions to amuse them; transport to get them into and around the city; and a marketing machine to sell the city hard.

The tricky bit is to get everyone working together and making the necessary investment. Simon Fanshawe, journalist, broadcaster and inveterate wag, who chairs the Brighton & Hove Economic Partnership, and is an indefatigable champion of the city and its cultural and economic renaissance, and will undoubtedly do his bit.


 

Who are the Punters?

The visitor economy has many sub divisions. Very important are the business tourists of the conference trade. For example, The British Society for Haematology has booked for 2009, and it is reckoned that its 1,000 plus delegates will generate about £1.3 of revenue over its few days. The huge Labour Party conference has booked for 2008 and 2009.

One of the challenges for the city is how to update its conference facilities, and stay in the game while the work is being done. It is planned to replace the aging Brighton Centre. But how? Plans for an ice rink arena at Blackrock which will have seating for up to 8,000 seem to be part of the solution.

Then there are the short break tourists. Britons may no longer take their annual holidays in Britain's seaside resorts in any number, but they will take short breaks, especially if there are plenty of cultural events to keep them amused.

Serviced accomodation in total (hotels and guest houses) is calculated to generate £172.63 million per year. Non-serviced (self-catering) weighs in at £11.98.

 

previous page / next page

Laganfauld About Us | Acknowledgements | Web Design Services | My Back Pages | ©2006 Laganfauld