thisbrighton.co.uk - Brighton: illustrated   (中文)

History: Brighton Beach, circa 1841

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Sewerage Problem

"It is not long since there existed an even greater objection to bathing in the open sea at Brighton, which has since been removed by the establishment of the great parallel sewer, executed with praiseworthy spirit and judgment by the town authorities: first, along the East Cliff, completed in 1839; and next. along the West Cliff and King's Road, which was in the act of completion at the time of my visit. By this arrangement the drainage and sewerage of Brighton are no longer suffered to mingle with the tidal water from a great many drain-pipes opening a little way on the beach, where I had often observed with disgust, before the recent improvements, the meandering streams of pollution issuing from those pipe, not far from where bathing took place, and in hot weather not only smelling abominably, but penetrating into the cellars of some of the houses.

"Lastly, we may reckon as amongst the impediments to good sea-bathing at Brighton, those singular-looking divisions of the beach into sections or parts called groynes, on each side of which the shingle will accumulate, and form as many ridges or backbones at right angles with the cliff, and against which it is by no means pleasant to knock one's head or one's feet while diving or swimming."

Bathing Machines

On Brighton's bathing machines, Granville had this to say:

"All these untoward circumstances render the aid of bathing-machines absolutely necessary, in order to transport the bathers far enough into clean water, four or five feet deep. Accordingly we find these useful auxiliaries during the bathing season ready on different points of the shore, and placed at such a distance as will secure the necessary quantity if water for a dip or plunge.

"At my last visit I found three stands of them destined for the use of the ladies, between Kemptown and the Old Steine; and four for gentlemen westward of the Steine, as far as Regency Square. The attendants are principally old women; but the ladies who use the machines on the beach at Kemptown, seem to prefer being carried to their distant, and almost floating cabinet-des-bains, in the brawny arms of stout, broad-shouldered fellows employed for that purpose. It would be ludicrous if it were not somewhat indecent, to behold how fast these modern naiads [nymphs] cling to their lusty neptunes while the latter hurry through the waves with their fair cargoes, until the deposit them in the floating bathroom, where a female attendant is at hand to help and guide them in and out of the water. Such a practice, however, (much as it may be deemed objectionable) the dangerous appearance of the shore in this place would seem almost to sanction."

 

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